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Three Day Antiques and Fine Art Sale - March 2007

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A fine pair of Victorian Franglais kingwood, tulipwood and rosewood ormolu and porcelain mounted parquetry cabinets on stands, in ancient regime transitional style, by Edward Holmes Baldock, the pagoda tops with hinged red velvet lined compartments above gilt bronze acanthus and guilloche mounted cavetto friezes, glazed rectangular doors enclosing mirrored interiors and glass shelves flanked by Ionic pilasters, inset with floral Sevres style porcelain plaques against bleu celeste ground, on Louis XV style stands, serpentine aprons, rococo gilt bronze mounts with further Sevres style plaques, painted with fanciful birds, cabriole legs, acanthus scroll sabots, 86cm wide 150cm high, c. 1840 Edward Holmes Baldock (1777 - 1845) a leading 19th century retailer of genuine pre revolutionary French furniture also dealt with contemporary pieces in the ancient regime style, generally of French manufacture but also by firms such as Edwards and Roberts and possibly his own work shops. He first appears at 7 Hanway Street, London in 1805, as a `.. dealer in china and glass'' but by 1821 as ``...an antique furniture and Ornamental furniture dealer''. He supplied not only William IV but also Queen Victorian with glass and fine china. Pieces such as this fine pair of cabinets marked E.H.B. are often thought to be made by him at Hanway Street workshop. Baldock influence is such that he was principle in the formation of some of the finest collects of French furniture formed in his period including that of George IV, George Byng M.P. and the Duke of Buccleuch He is known to have employed the Quaker artist Thomas Martin Randall at Madeley in Shropshire to embellish undecorated Sevres and many of the porcelain medallions and plaques used to decorate his furniture are closely allied to the work of Randall. Lord Shelbourne, who was created 1st Marquess Lansdowne in 1784 had formed a collection which was sold at auction by Coxe, Bussel and Foster in 1806, on the orders of the 2nd Marquess, in order to pay his father's debts. The Lansdowne's Wiltshire seat, Bowood was redesigned by his half brother, the third Marquess, and became a grand and fashionable 19th Century house under the guidance of the architects C.R. Cockerell and Sir Charles Barry. The main part of this house was demolished in 1955 but is known to have contained French style furniture. Having supplied notable Scottish houses it may be likely that the cabinets originated from Meikleour in Perthshire, the family's Scottish estate
sold for £29000.00

1986

A fine pair of Victorian Franglais kingwood, tulipwood and rosewood ormolu and porcelain mounted parquetry cabinets on stands, in ancient regime transitional style, by Edward Holmes Baldock, the pagoda tops with hinged red velvet lined compartments above gilt bronze acanthus and guilloche mounted cavetto friezes, glazed rectangular doors enclosing mirrored interiors and glass shelves flanked by Ionic pilasters, inset with floral Sevres style porcelain plaques against bleu celeste ground, on Louis XV style stands, serpentine aprons, rococo gilt bronze mounts with further Sevres style plaques, painted with fanciful birds, cabriole legs, acanthus scroll sabots, 86cm wide 150cm high, c. 1840 Edward Holmes Baldock (1777 - 1845) a leading 19th century retailer of genuine pre revolutionary French furniture also dealt with contemporary pieces in the ancient regime style, generally of French manufacture but also by firms such as Edwards and Roberts and possibly his own work shops. He first appears at 7 Hanway Street, London in 1805, as a `.. dealer in china and glass'' but by 1821 as ``...an antique furniture and Ornamental furniture dealer''. He supplied not only William IV but also Queen Victorian with glass and fine china. Pieces such as this fine pair of cabinets marked E.H.B. are often thought to be made by him at Hanway Street workshop. Baldock influence is such that he was principle in the formation of some of the finest collects of French furniture formed in his period including that of George IV, George Byng M.P. and the Duke of Buccleuch He is known to have employed the Quaker artist Thomas Martin Randall at Madeley in Shropshire to embellish undecorated Sevres and many of the porcelain medallions and plaques used to decorate his furniture are closely allied to the work of Randall. Lord Shelbourne, who was created 1st Marquess Lansdowne in 1784 had formed a collection which was sold at auction by Coxe, Bussel and Foster in 1806, on the orders of the 2nd Marquess, in order to pay his father's debts. The Lansdowne's Wiltshire seat, Bowood was redesigned by his half brother, the third Marquess, and became a grand and fashionable 19th Century house under the guidance of the architects C.R. Cockerell and Sir Charles Barry. The main part of this house was demolished in 1955 but is known to have contained French style furniture. Having supplied notable Scottish houses it may be likely that the cabinets originated from Meikleour in Perthshire, the family's Scottish estate

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