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Collectors Sale September 2010

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 "This is all wrong, isn't it"  Rare and Important letters from   Oscar Wilde  Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 - 30 November 1900) Irish writer and poet, born Dublin. He read Classics at Trinity College, Dublin and then Greats at Magdalene College, Oxford, where he was associated with the aesthetic and decadent movements. After graduating he returned briefly to his home country before settling in London. In his early career he spent much of his time lecturing and travelling between London and Paris. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd and fathered two sons, Cyril (1885) and Vyvyan (1886). After the birth of his second child he had a series of homosexual liaisons. Wilde started to write for a number of Society magazines, and in 1887 became editor of The Lady's World, changing the name to The Woman's World.  He left journalism in 1889 and became a serious writer with his only novel The Picture of Dorian Gray published as the lead story in the July 1890 edition of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine. Then he wrote plays, Salome and society comedies, Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest, published in 1895. He was confirmed as one of London's most popular playwrights. His homosexuality became more open and in 1895 he was accused by the Marquess of Queensbury of corrupting his son, Lord Alfred Douglas. Queensbury left a calling card for Wilde at the Albemarle Club addressed to "Oscar Wilde, posing somdomite (sic)". Queensberry's curiously spelled note amounted to a public accusation that Wilde had committed a felony and Queensberry could only avoid conviction for libel by demonstrating that his accusation was true. Wilde sued and lost, the court declared that Queensbury's accusation that Wilde was "posing as a Somdomite" (sic) was justified, "true in substance and in fact".  The resultant court costs bankrupted Wilde and on leaving court, a warrant for his arrest was applied for on charges of sodomy and gross indecency. The prosecution opened on the 26 April 1895, Wilde pleaded not guilty. The trial ended with the jury unable to reach a verdict. Wilde was freed from Holloway. A further trial was presided over by Mr Justice Wills and on 25 May 1895 Wilde and Alfred Taylor were convicted of gross indecency and sentenced to two years' hard labour. Wilde was imprisoned firstly in Pentonville and then Wandsworth. Richard Haldane, the Liberal MP, visited him and had him transferred in November to HM's Prison, Reading, 30 miles west of London. In prison he wrote De Profundis. Wilde was released on the 19 May 1897 and left England the next day for the continent never to return and spent his last three years under the name "Sebastian Melmoth". Wilde spent mid-1897 in Berneval-le-Grand, where he wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol. The poem narrates the execution of a man who murdered his wife for her infidelity. During the latter part of 1897, Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas were reunited and lived together near Naples for a few months. Wilde's final address was the H
sold for £3500.00

67

"This is all wrong, isn't it" Rare and Important letters from Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (16 October 1854 - 30 November 1900) Irish writer and poet, born Dublin. He read Classics at Trinity College, Dublin and then Greats at Magdalene College, Oxford, where he was associated with the aesthetic and decadent movements. After graduating he returned briefly to his home country before settling in London. In his early career he spent much of his time lecturing and travelling between London and Paris. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd and fathered two sons, Cyril (1885) and Vyvyan (1886). After the birth of his second child he had a series of homosexual liaisons. Wilde started to write for a number of Society magazines, and in 1887 became editor of The Lady's World, changing the name to The Woman's World. He left journalism in 1889 and became a serious writer with his only novel The Picture of Dorian Gray published as the lead story in the July 1890 edition of Lippincott's Monthly Magazine. Then he wrote plays, Salome and society comedies, Lady Windermere's Fan, A Woman of No Importance, An Ideal Husband and his masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest, published in 1895. He was confirmed as one of London's most popular playwrights. His homosexuality became more open and in 1895 he was accused by the Marquess of Queensbury of corrupting his son, Lord Alfred Douglas. Queensbury left a calling card for Wilde at the Albemarle Club addressed to "Oscar Wilde, posing somdomite (sic)". Queensberry's curiously spelled note amounted to a public accusation that Wilde had committed a felony and Queensberry could only avoid conviction for libel by demonstrating that his accusation was true. Wilde sued and lost, the court declared that Queensbury's accusation that Wilde was "posing as a Somdomite" (sic) was justified, "true in substance and in fact". The resultant court costs bankrupted Wilde and on leaving court, a warrant for his arrest was applied for on charges of sodomy and gross indecency. The prosecution opened on the 26 April 1895, Wilde pleaded not guilty. The trial ended with the jury unable to reach a verdict. Wilde was freed from Holloway. A further trial was presided over by Mr Justice Wills and on 25 May 1895 Wilde and Alfred Taylor were convicted of gross indecency and sentenced to two years' hard labour. Wilde was imprisoned firstly in Pentonville and then Wandsworth. Richard Haldane, the Liberal MP, visited him and had him transferred in November to HM's Prison, Reading, 30 miles west of London. In prison he wrote De Profundis. Wilde was released on the 19 May 1897 and left England the next day for the continent never to return and spent his last three years under the name "Sebastian Melmoth". Wilde spent mid-1897 in Berneval-le-Grand, where he wrote The Ballad of Reading Gaol. The poem narrates the execution of a man who murdered his wife for her infidelity. During the latter part of 1897, Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas were reunited and lived together near Naples for a few months. Wilde's final address was the H

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